Blog

On this page you will find articles, free audio and video, and other resources that may give you tips on working toward healing and growth. Whether you struggle with stress, anxiety, depression, trauma, or addictive behaviors, no matter the struggles you come here with, this is a place for you to get some tips to support you.


Different Ways of Sitting in Meditation

Many people are often curious about different ways we can sit in meditation.

Below is a short informal video I made around sitting meditation. I would also add that you can fold pillows to create a cushion, sit on a Zafu Meditation Cushion (I prefer buckwheat filling, it sustains longer), a Meditation Bench that allows for a straight spine, or sit in a chair, comfortable, again with the spine straight to allow for an ease of breathing.

Play with what works best for you. Here’s to your practice!

Warmly,

Elisha

P.S. – If you’d like to go deeper into sustaining a practice of Mindful Living – A Course in Mindful Living is a global online mentorship program that begins October 2, 2017.


A Wise Approach to Taking in the News

In this day and age global news is everywhere. We get it from traditional news stations, social media, or just alerts from friends, family and colleagues.

The news always seems to come in the form of headlines that are meant to stimulate our nervous systems. This is so our eyes will stare more often and longer at the screen and they can charge more money for their ads. It’s pure economics.

We also have become accustomed to reading news in smaller bytes which means we usually jump from the headlines into a judgment or opinion and begin sharing it with other people prior to really investigating the story.

Shoshanna Goldstein, who has assisted me at Kripalu during my Uncovering Happiness Retreats and her husband John Tedesco, reminded me recently of a very important practice when it comes to a mindful (and necessary) way to engage news that I think would not only serve us individually in keeping our nervous systems balanced, but could help our culture as a whole.

Here it is:

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Are You Harboring Weapons of Mass Distraction?

You may have already realized that the geniuses behind many of the apps and media websites that we visit daily have crafted their apps to play on our anxious and addictive tendencies. Why? Because the more frequent and longer our eyeballs stay on a page means they can sell advertisements for more $$$.

Does it matter that it makes us more distracted, listen less to the people around us or increase mortality rates for car accidents?

Take a moment and watch this brilliant short video…you’ll love the graphics and the artistic spoken word.

So what does it mean to spend our time well? Or maybe a better question is what does it mean to be more intentional with our attention?

At this point, most of our brains have been trained by the tech’s environmental cues to jerk over to it the minute we either hear it, see it or feel it. Is it Time Well Spent to get sucked into 30 Continue Reading →


Charting the Course for Mindfulness: An Interview with Everyday Mindfulness and Elisha Goldstein

In this interview I sit down with Gerard Evans of Everyday Mindfulness to discuss what we need (and is currently missing) in the secular mindfulness field to help make mindfulness meditation stickier. Enjoy!

Warmly,

Elisha

PS – If you want to bring this alive in your life, learn more about a next level global mentorship program – A Course in Mindful Living. Starts October 2, 2017.


The Relational Neuroscience Behind How to Change a Habit for Good

Most of us walk around in this world in a trance with the delusional belief that we are only autonomous beings that are completely acting with free will. However, many scientists agree that we are interdependent with our environments and our brains are constantly making snap judgments based on internal and external cues.

You have recall this quote by Albert Einstein:

“A human being is a part of the whole called by us universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feeling as something separated from the rest, a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.”

The notion of willpower, pulling ourselves up by our bootstraps, or manning up fails to take the psychological and scientific realities into mind. Alcoholics Anonymous has it right, if you’re addicted to substances you need to get them out of the house and begin to change your relationships. This was certainly my experience with my own struggle with substances years ago.

Considering the impact of our environments on our ability to be happy and make the changes we want to make, can drastically facilitate more adherence to whatever habits you’re trying to break or create.

Years ago, UC Berkeley Researcher Marian Diamond conducted a study where she randomly put mice in a few different cages. One had toys and playmates, one had playmates and one had neither. After a few weeks, they found that the brains of the mice that had toys and playmates had thicker cerebral cortices than the other two. This part of the brain is associated with higher order functions like cognitive processing. In fact, the one without toys and playmates showed the thinnest layer.

This is just to say that our environments not only impact our behavior, but also impact our brains (which impact our behavior).

So what’s the secret sauce?

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